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Jessica Greene, PhD on Lessons Learned from a Large, Team-Based Quality Incentive

Today we are delighted to welcome Jessica Greene, PhD as a Keynote Speaker for this Breakthrough Opportunities event on Designing Provider Incentives with the Commonwealth Fund.

Dr. Greene is a Professor in the George Washington University School of Nursing, where she also serves as the Associate Dean for Research.

In this video, Dr. Greene discusses key lessons learned from her evaluation of the primary care team-based quality incentive program implemented at Fairview Health Services, a Pioneer accountable care organization in Minnesota.

We look forward to hearing your thoughts on Dr. Greene’s video below, and encourage you to submit ideas sparked by the topics covered: http://www.ghdonline.org/designing-provider-incentives/submit-idea/

(Note for those viewing this update via email, please click through to view Dr. Greene’s video on GHDonline: http://www.ghdonline.org/designing-provider-incentives/keynote/jessica-greene... )

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Lydia Green Replied at 1:05 PM, 11 Dec 2015

Thanks for reporting your key findings from this study - really interesting - and unexpected - outcomes.

My background is in sales support so I am more familiar with how financial incentives are used in business vs medicine. But the incentives you described - individual, team and and knowing that your outcomes will be shared publicly - are the same as are used at my last company. And I chuckled, because I recall being in sales meetings where each sale's person' s name was projected on a large screen that would report their individual performance and what percent of quota they achieved. To me, it would have been mortifying to watch data projections showing I was one of the worse performers, but for sale people it drove them to do better next quarter so they could "beat" their colleagues.

This leads to a thought - financial incentives work well in business because sales people are extremely competitive and driven and money is the measure of success. However, these are people who measure their success at work - and are primarily motivated - by their ability to surpass their performance objectives and make a lot of money. They are very laser focused in that they are driven by the need to win.

Perhaps one factor contributing to your study findings is that physicians, unlike business people, are very different in their motivations and aspirations and therefore do not react as expected to financial incentives.

Just a thought:-)

This Community is Archived.

This community is no longer active as of December 2018. Thanks to those who posted here and made this information available to others visiting the site.