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Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD on Using Behavioral Economics to Design Provider Incentives

We are delighted to welcome Kevin Volpp, MD, PhD as our first Keynote Speaker for this Breakthrough Opportunities event on Designing Provider Incentives with the Commonwealth Fund.

Dr. Volpp is the founding Director of the Leonard Davis Institute Center for Health Incentives and Behavioral Economics, a Professor of Medicine and Vice Chairman for Health Policy of the Department of Medical Ethics and Policy at the Perelman School of Medicine, a Professor of Health Care Management at the Wharton School, and one of two Directors of the University of Pennsylvania CDC Prevention Research Center.

In our first video, Dr. Volpp discusses key principles in behavioral economics and how they can be used to design incentive programs that lead to better health outcomes.

Kevin and his team recently published their findings in the Annals of Internal Medicine in their paper, “Using Behavioral Economics to Design Physician Incentives That Deliver High-Value Care.”

We look forward to hearing your thoughts on Dr. Volpp’s video below, and encourage you to submit ideas sparked by the topics covered: http://www.ghdonline.org/designing-provider-incentives/submit-idea/

(Note for those viewing this update via email, please click through to view Dr. Volpp’s video on GHDonline: http://www.ghdonline.org/designing-provider-incentives/discussion/kevin-volpp...)

Keywords:

Attached resource:

  • Using Behavioral Economics to Design Physician Incentives That Deliver High-Value Care (external URL)

    Link leads to: http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2471601

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    A/Prof. Terry HANNAN Replied at 6:07 PM, 7 Dec 2015

    The video would not open for me however Dr Volpp's paper in the Annals has opened up a how a new knowledge base and perspectives on this topic. I look forwards to learning more.

    Amit Shah Advisor Replied at 6:23 PM, 7 Dec 2015

    Agreed. The insights and principles shared by Dr. Volpp are helpful and actionable. Many payors are acting on these today - often grappling with the tensions between these principles (e.g., simplicity and frequency of payment). I would also suggest that many of these principles hold true for performance reporting and performance dialogues that should accompany incentives. For example, everything from salience to simplicity and frequency of feedback are important principles to guide the design and delivery of physician level scorecards.

    Separately, an important question across many of the principles is how can payors begin to tailor incentives and the complementary performance management systems to match the needs of different provider types (while balancing customization with operational complexity)? Some payors are beginning to tackle this by altering incentive design by provider size (e.g., small vs large PCP practices).

    Jennie van de Weerd Replied at 8:53 AM, 10 Dec 2015

    Sorry, but even when signing in, I cannot download the article on the annals. Is it possible to share this as an attachment to the emails you are sending out in this discussion?

    Maggie Sullivan Advisor Replied at 1:36 PM, 11 Dec 2015

    I am intrigued by Dr Volpp's mention of shared provider-member/patient incentives. As a provider, I would welcome the recognition and respect of the collaborative nature of this relationship. One of my fears of financial incentives is that providers would 'push' patients toward behaviors/choices that would end up padding the provider's pocket. If I get a bonus for seeing more than a certain number of patients in a day, then my clinical encounters could become very short and less effective, thereby setting the stage for patients having to come back in short order, or feeling discouraged and not returning at all. What could have taken me 20 minutes to get to the bottom of an issue and work with the patient to resolve it once and for all, may now take 3 visits of 6-7 minutes each to get to the same place (after who knows how many months, if the patient is able to get off work and return to clinic, if the problem in the meantime does not land the patient in the ED, etc). Orienting incentives toward leveraging a collaborative relationship between providers and patients is good for everyone. I would love to hear more about what examples of this might look like, and rates of successful implementation. I would also welcome a return of focus to the nature of the relationship, rather than rewarding doing things 'to' patients.

    This Community is Archived.

    This community is no longer active as of December 2018. Thanks to those who posted here and made this information available to others visiting the site.