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HPV Vaccine in Rwanda: Different Disease, Same Double Standard

By Agnès Binagwaho, MD, M(Ped) | 05 Dec, 2011

Dear colleagues and friends around the world,

I would like to share a Correspondence piece that I published this week in The Lancet regarding debates about using and paying for the Human Papillomavirus vaccine in low-income countries: “HPV Vaccine in Rwanda: Different Disease, Same Double Standard.” It is attached as a Resource.

We respond to a group of public health researchers who wrote a piece in July that was critical of Rwanda's program and made several claims which have been echoed in other corners of the international community. We draw parallel between this resistance and that of many debates about providing antiretroviral therapy in Africa last decade.

We have detailed articles on strategy, delivery, and outcomes of Rwanda’s program underway, and will post at GHDOnline when they are published.

What do others think of this kind of resistance? How can researchers and implementers work best together to overcome it in our work for health and human rights?

Thanks

Attached resource:
  • "HPV Vaccine in Rwanda: Different Disease, Same Double Standard" (external URL)

    Link leads to: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(11)61837-0/fulltext

    Summary: Dear colleagues and friends around the world,

    I would like to share a Correspondence piece that I published this week in The Lancet regarding debates about using and paying for the Human Papillomavirus vaccine in low-income countries: “HPV Vaccine in Rwanda: Different Disease, Same Double Standard.” It is attached as a Resource.

    We respond to a group of public health researchers who wrote a piece in July that was critical of Rwanda's program and made several claims which have been echoed in other corners of the international community. We draw parallel between this resistance and that of many debates about providing antiretroviral therapy in Africa last decade.

    We have detailed articles on strategy, delivery, and outcomes of Rwanda’s program underway, and will post at GHDOnline when they are published.

    What do others think of this kind of resistance? How can researchers and implementers work best together to overcome it in our work for health and human rights?

    Thanks

    Source: The Lancet

    Keywords: cancer, Gardasil, GAVI, HPV, Human Papillomavus, Publications & Research, Risk Factors & Prevention, Rwanda, vaccine

Replies

 

RENE KABERA Replied at 4:27 AM, 5 Dec 2011

Hon Minister,Thank you for the work done.The same poeple who are resisting will come on another day pointing out Cervical Ca in our community.The important issue is that the best solution for the prevention has been implemented.Keep it up. KABERA Rene MD - Family Medicine/Rwanda

Thaddeus Musembi Replied at 5:18 AM, 7 Dec 2011

It's a good thing to have opposite ideas.
The aim of the both parties of you is to reach and serve people, and hence its better if you sit and see where you differ, how and why.

Its obviously that you must have undergone some sort of research before you implemented that program.

My advice is, it will be worthy if you and the group will review the indicators used by both parties.
I think of such a resistance as a kind of challenge which if well handled will benefit the society the lot and can also provide the best practice an partnership.

Jeff Meer Replied at 10:05 AM, 20 Dec 2011

Readers of this exchange might be interested in a blog I wrote recently on the same subject. It appears at this link: http://dialogue4health.ning.com/profiles/blogs/whether-to-prevent-ncds-in-afr....

This Community is Archived.

This community is no longer active as of December 2018. Thanks to those who posted here and made this information available to others visiting the site.