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Humanitarian Surgery Aid Course Feb 7-8, Center for Innovation and Global Health Stanford University

By Sherry Wren | 05 Dec, 2014

The Center for Global Health and Innovation at Stanford University School of Medicine (SUSM), CA, will host a one-and-a-half day continuing medical education course (CME), February 7 -8, on humanitarian surgery missions in developing countries. The third annual international humanitarian aid skills course will review common conditions encountered in resource-limited environments. Through a variety of techniques including skill stations and simulation, the course will provide instructions on common procedures required in developing nations. The course will also offer instruction on the essential elements of surgical safety, ethics, and cultural considerations in such settings.
Specific procedures that will be covered include orthopaedic dislocations and fracture management with traction pins and external fixation, cesarean sections, post-partum hemorrhage, burn management and hand cutting of skin grafts, tendon repairs, tropical medicine for surgical diseases, emergency craniotomy, and low-resource anesthetic techniques. View the course description and register online. http://cme.stanford.edu/humanitarian/ . Register by January 23 . Space is limited. SUSM designates this live activity for a maximum of 10.50 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditsTM. Discounted hotel information is available on the website.

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Replies

 

Vincent Waite Replied at 9:55 AM, 6 Dec 2014

I attended this course last year and found the faculty, lectures and practical hands on sessions to be very valuable and well worth my trip to California. The course is both valuable to General Surgeons and those of us who are not surgeons but are well experienced in the OR. I am a Family Doctor.
Vince Waite, M.D., MPH

This Community is Archived.

This community is no longer active as of December 2018. Thanks to those who posted here and made this information available to others visiting the site.