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Text messages could hasten tuberculosis drug compliance

By Amy Madore | 02 Jan, 2009

This article briefly explores how mobile phone technologies can be used to improve tuberculosis treatment compliance. It suggests patient monitoring and support through SMS as one less costly and human-resource intensive alternative, or supplement, to the DOTS program. Using mobile phones might also enable health workers to reach patients in extremely remote areas, as well as those who receive treatment at private clinics and "fall through the cracks" when they are not monitored closely by their care provider.

This article is cross-linked in the Adherence & Retention community: www.ghdonline.org/adherence/

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Attached resource:
  • Text messages could hasten tuberculosis drug compliance (external URL)

    Link leads to: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140673608619388/fulltext?_eventId=login&rss=yes

    Summary: This article briefly explores how mobile phone technologies can be used to improve tuberculosis treatment compliance. It suggests patient monitoring and support through SMS as one less costly and human-resource intensive alternative, or supplement, to the DOTS program. Using mobile phones might also enable health workers to reach patients in extremely remote areas, as well as those who receive treatment at private clinics and "fall through the cracks" when they are not monitored closely by their care provider.

    This article is cross-linked in the Adherence & Retention community: www.ghdonline.org/adherence/

    To access the full article, click on the link below and sign up (free) to be a member of Lancet.com. Registration takes less than a minute.

    Source: The Lancet

    Publication Date: January 3, 2009

    Language: English

    Keywords: compliance, dots, Mobile Devices, SMS, text messaging, tuberculosis

 

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