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Article on NCD burden for policy-makers

By Christine Ngaruiya | 13 Oct, 2015

Hello:

I am sharing an Op-Ed piece I've written pegged around the SDGs that was published in "The Hill" today, Washington's number one circulated publication on Capitol Hill.

http://thehill.com/blogs/congress-blog/healthcare/256697-silent-killers-pande...

In solidarity,

Christine Ngaruiya, MD, DTM&H
Section of Global Health and International Emergency Medicine
Department of Emergency Medicine
Yale New Haven Hospitals
MSc candidate, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 2015


+1 203-997-5882

Replies

 

Florence Tushemerirwe Replied at 2:21 AM, 14 Oct 2015

Hi Christine,

I love that article. You are spot on. I agree with you, the starting point
to reducing or prevention NCDs is with the diet, and people have the right
to know and understand the effects of what they eat.

Is your research in this area too? My research is in this area in rural
Uganda. The prevalence of Type-2 Diabetes in my my research target
community is 7. 4%, it is comparable to the global prevalence (7% according
to International Diabetes Federation, 2013).
Part of my intervention is diet modifications, which we think will yield
great results.

Let me know if you are researching in that area, we could collaborate.

Florence

Christine Ngaruiya Replied at 2:34 AM, 14 Oct 2015

What an awesome coincidence. Thanks for the message Florence. I'm actually on a grant assessing malnutrition (with an overnutrition spin on it myself) in Uganda :). Was just there a couple of weeks ago in fact. Let's talk more offline? Nutrition is a major focus.

With thanks,


Christine Ngaruiya, MD, DTM&H
Section of Global Health and International Emergency Medicine
Department of Emergency Medicine
Yale New Haven Hospitals
MSc candidate, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 2015

Poyap Rooney Replied at 8:44 AM, 14 Oct 2015

Hello folks,

I have started a private community-based clinic in urban Port Moresby,
PNG. There is very scarce data about diabetes in PNG. I plan to
facilitate the establishment of a PNG Association of diabetics the majority
of membership of which will be made of people living with diabetes which I
hope will be a influencial advocate of higher spending on diabetes/NCD care
and prevention.

Has anyone here been involved in establishing such an association. I seek
some advise as I push along.

Poyap Rooney, MBBS, MMED (UPNG)

PS apologies if this is not the appropriate thread.

Happy Ghosh Replied at 7:31 PM, 18 Oct 2015

Thanks for sharing your great article. Clearly, we can no longer ignore the the burden of NCDs, and I think the SDGs may lead us in the right direction. One thing that I often question is how to approach the NCD problem sustainably? I mentioned in one of my courses that the idea of sustainable solutions requires regeneration, the ability for the local community to reproduce results after the initial resources are entirely used. Approaches to this generally include education, policy, and either improving infrastructure for developing materials or working within existing constructs to find alternative solutions with local materials. So when it comes to NCDs, how can we do this, especially since so many NCDs are correlated with lifestyle and environmental factors? Lifestyle factors can perhaps be addressed with educational campaigns similar to what we do in the U.S. Here, we also use technology to make a healthy lifestyle easier, for example, with apps that can plan our meals and help us maintain an exercise regimen. Still, access to these measures is limited for the socioeconomically disadvantaged. If the solutions we present are not accessible to everyone, then they cannot be sustainable. Environmental factors are even more difficult to change, and the current approach has included, for example, lobbying climate change and investing in alternative fuels. Is this the best way to make changes in a global context? Is there a more efficient route that ensures access to resources for all groups? I am sure the answers to these questions vary depending on location and problem, but as we continue to implement solutions, they are considerations that we must keep in mind.

Christine Ngaruiya Replied at 5:48 PM, 20 Oct 2015

Happy-

I agree with you on many of these points. I think that we still have more questions than answers because we still lack adequate original research in these settings, and it's difficult (and generally not correct) to transfer findings from "the west" to these settings. I think the problem has to be "sustainably" addressed through both bottom-up but also top-down measures ie policy, and policy-maker buy-in, and other administration prioritizing of NCD issues. I can speak a bit on the topic of mHealth and NCDs as I've recently done some work on the area and can say that for sure not much has been on this (research-wise) in the African setting (a few studies in Southern Africa and one or two western African countries), more done in India, China, some in South America, as far as other LMICs. We have some data that should be coming out soon that showed it may actually be an equitable means of accessing marginalized populations. More soon on that I hope! Otherwise, kudos for your work too! Hoping for better and more.

CN


Christine Ngaruiya, MD, DTM&H
Section of Global Health and International Emergency Medicine
Department of Emergency Medicine
Yale New Haven Hospitals
MSc candidate, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 2015

This Community is Archived.

This community is no longer active as of December 2018. Thanks to those who posted here and made this information available to others visiting the site.